Home
Search
Topics
Contact
About

The Blessing Of Blessings

The closer to the Lord we get, the more clearly we can perceive good and evil, truth and falsehood, blessing and cursing, value and vanity and the more we will be blessed. He reveals what they need to know only to those who draw near to Him. Sadly, those who stay far from Him outnumber those that draw near.

Psalms 73:27-28: For, lo, they that are far from thee shall perish: thou hast destroyed all them that go a whoring from thee. 28 But it is good for me to draw near to God: I have put my trust in the Lord GOD, that I may declare all thy works.

When we draw closer to Him we are able to declare more of His works because we have more knowledge of them. We will know that His works are worthy. We will see his work in the creation, in ourselves and all around us more clearly.

There is only one thing that keeps us from God and from knowing Him, unconfessed, unforsaken and unforgiven sin.

Isaiah 59:2: But your iniquities have separated between you and your God, and your sins have hid his face from you, that he will not hear.

Proverbs 28:13: He that covereth his sins shall not prosper: but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall have mercy.

Psalms 27:4: One thing have I desired of the LORD, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the LORD, and to enquire in his temple.

Psalms 16:11: Thou wilt shew me the path of life: in thy presence is fulness of joy; at thy right hand there are pleasures for evermore.

The forgiveness of our sin is the blessing of blessings. There is nothing to compare with it.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon on Isaiah 40:9: Get thee up into the high mountain.

Our knowledge of Christ is somewhat like climbing one of our Welsh mountains. When you are at the base you see but little: the mountain itself appears to be but one-half as high as it really is. Confined in a little valley, you discover scarcely anything but the rippling brooks as they descend into the stream at the foot of the mountain. Climb the first rising knoll, and the valley lengthens and widens beneath your feet. Go higher, and you see the country for four or five miles round, and you are delighted with the widening prospect. Mount still, and the scene enlarges; till at last, when you are on the summit, and look east, west, north, and south, you see almost all England lying before you. Yonder is a forest in some distant county, perhaps two hundred miles away, and here the sea, and there a shining river and the smoking chimneys of a manufacturing town, or the masts of the ships in a busy port. All these things please and delight you, and you say, *I could not have imagined that so much could be seen at this elevation.* Now, the Christian life is of the same order. When we first believe in Christ we see but little of Him. The higher we climb the more we discover of His beauties. But who has ever gained the summit? Who has known all the heights and depths of the love of Christ which passes knowledge? Paul, when grown old, sitting grey-haired, shivering in a dungeon in Rome, could say with greater emphasis than we can, *I know whom I have believed,* for each experience had been like the climbing of a hill, each trial had been like ascending another summit, and his death seemed like gaining the top of the mountain, from which he could see the whole of the faithfulness and the love of Him to whom he had committed his soul. Get thee up, dear friend, into the high mountain.

Care to discuss Blessing Of Blessings, The with Ron?

He'd also like to hear your prayer requests